Home Foundation Repair Problems

Finding problems with  the structure of your home is distressing to say the least.

Structural home problems can range from small issues that are easy to fix, to structural damages that can take a week or more. The cost associated with these problems can also vary, from a $500 repair issue to more serious amounts.

Finding a crack on the basement walls, water sitting on the basement floor, humidity, mold or mildew are serious problems that you have to addressed quickly. Waiting can only lead to more serious issues that can end up costing you a lot more.

Hiring a professional to look over the foundation problems in your home is the only option you have.  Structural problems are serious issues, and you want the expertise and warranties associated with hiring a professional company to do the job.

How do you know which company to hire?  There are many companies out there with a reputation that bears not mentioning.  But, there are many other companies that pride themselves with the work they do, and the history they have in the community. Looking at the credentials of the company you are thinking of hiring can save you a lot of headaches and a lot of money.

Where can you start?  Looking at a company at the Better Business Bureau is the first step you can take.  Look at the complains, and whether they were resolved satisfactorily, and in a timely matter. But, most importantly look at the kind of complains people had and the issues involved with such company.

Google the company. There are many people out there that will leave a nasty comment about a company because they are not quite happy with the results.  But, if the company has many more good comments than bad ones, or only that bad comment, call them and see for yourself.  Talking to them on the phone, or personally is the only way to go.

Recommendations from friends and family members are possibly the best way to go about hiring a company to do any job around the home.  You can look at the workmanship, talk to them about pricing, cleanliness, and punctuality and make the decision then.

If you need the services of a company with a long history in the community and an A+ rating from the BBB, contact us.  We will be happy to offer you a solution to your basement and foundation problems without hard selling you.


Keeping Your Basement Dry To Enjoy The Extra Room

Families that choose to finish their basement to acquire the needed extra space, have to first make sure the basement is dry and will stay dry for the foreseeable future.  Remodeling or finishing the basement to make room for a man cave or a children’s play room requires to have a basement that is waterproofed.  If your basement is  home to your washer and dryer, or any other home appliance, keeping them in a basement that is dry will assure you of their long life, and hopefully maintenance free due to the humidity in the basement. For more about this and other topics, follow the links below.


Heart of the Home: Keeping your basement dry

With spring right around the corner, the timing seemed to be perfect when I heard from the folks at U.S. Waterproofing, a basement waterproofing service company.

“We get the most calls in the spring, when people sell their home or from people who just bought one,” said Matt Stock, president of U.S. Waterproofing. “It’s those calls from buyers — who have a surprise, undisclosed and expensive basement leak — that break our hearts. We know they weren’t prepared for that kind of expense upon moving into their new home.”

A third-generation family member in the basement waterproofing business, Stock said he began assisting his family in all-things-basements when he was 12.

In 2012, Stock launched the U.S. Waterproofing Learning Center, to educate homeowners, real estate agents, home inspectors and others concerned with home improvement, waterproofing, and repair. Below, he dishes out some good, sound advice.


Homeowner wants to turn basement into man cave

Ravenna, Brimfield, Suffield, Randolph, Rootstown, Streetsboro, Atwater, Deerfield, Aurora, Freedom, Hiram, Edinburg, Palmyra, Shalersville, Windham, Garrettsville, Mantua

Dear Jerry: Our house is newly built in Webster-Penfield in 2016.  The basement cinder block walls have dimple board on the outside that is somehow tied in with the French drain — whatever that is……

I always recommend that folks live in a house at least a year prior to finishing a basement, mostly to monitor potential water issues.  Given what you’ve said about waterproofing, there may be adequate water protection on the exterior.  If you’ve had no water issues to date, I think you can continue with your project.

First I would remove the existing insulation. If there is separate joist or rim band insulation, that’s fine. If not, I’d add that material now. Next, I’d apply a waterproofing such as Drylok on the concrete blocks, following directions and being careful not to let the masonry paint get on the floor or seep into the trough around the perimeter of the slab.  A roll of felt paper, used as floor protection, will be helpful here. Any debris in the trench should be removed.

Normally, I would recommend drilling weep holes in the block cavities closest to the floor. That way, any water that makes its way onto the walls from the exterior can drain out of the blocks and into the trench.  You might check with your builder to find out exactly what kind of waterproofing and drainage systems were done to the basement during construction.  If he or she deems this adequate, then you may want to omit the weep holes.


With these tips from the happy homeowner playbook, create the ideal setting for that top-rated washer/dryer pair from CR’s tests

Carrying loads of dirty laundry from the bedroom down to the basement or utility room is a cumbersome task at best. So if your washer and dryer are still parked in one of those far-away spaces, it’s time to bring them out of the shadows and into your main living area.

In addition to making life more convenient, the move could pay for itself when you sell your home. In a 2017 survey of homebuyers by the National Association of Home Builders, a dedicated laundry room was No. 1 on the list of most desired home features, considered essential or desirable by 90 percent of respondents. It’s also high on the must-haves for millennials, who now represent the largest home-buying cohort, according to the National Association of Realtors.

Home remodelers are hot on the laundry room trend as well. “When the house can support it, what’s not to like about a separate laundry room?” says Dale Contant, president of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry and owner of Atlanta Design & Build, a residential remodeling firm based in Marietta, Ga.


 

Do You Need Help Buying Your First Home?

stock-photo-17128627-unfinished-basement

Are you trying to buy your first home?  According to The National Association of Realtors, 2015 will be a year for first-time homebuyers.  That said, do you know what to look for when looking for your first home?  There are many pitfalls to avoid when dealing with something this important, after all you will be living and perhaps raising a family there as well.  Below are some articles that could help you in your quest for that home you have always dreamed about, and avoiding some catastrophic mistakes at the same time.


How Contingencies Protect a First-Time Homebuyer

When buying a home, there are seemingly hundreds of details to attend to, especially as a first-time homebuyer. Those details can range from the critical to the merely inconvenient, from property lines to pets. One important matter you’ll encounter is that of the contingency.

“Contingencies are your ‘out’ clause,” says Tim Freund, a real estate broker in the Los Angeles area. “They allow a buyer to get out of an agreement legitimately.”

But you want to buy a house, not get out of a deal. What’s that about?
Common contingencies
Contingencies are your built-in buyer protection plan, placing conditions on the sale that ensure you’re not taken advantage of. The most common contingency is a physical inspection, which allows buyers to determine whether there’s an issue with the home that’s bigger than they’re willing to tackle. That could be a leaky roof, a crumbling foundation — or a transmission line buried in your backyard.


10 Tips for First-Time Homebuyers

ANAHEIM, Calif.June 16, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — The National Association of Realtors has speculated that 2015 will be the year of the first-time homebuyer, and as many aspiring homeowners begin to dip their toes in real estate, they should prepare themselves for what can sometimes be tricky waters. With careful forethought and planning, newcomers to the real estate realm can make sure that they are ready to buy their dream home as soon as they find it. Here are 10 tips to help first-time homebuyers navigate their way to becoming homeowners.

    1. Know what you can afford  
      When looking for a new home, make your search more effective by knowing how much home you can afford. Carefully calculate the overall monthly payments. Be sure to include additional costs like property taxes, insurance premiums, homeowners insurance, homeowners’ association dues (if applicable), etc. Look at your monthly budget to understand how a mortgage payment will fit into it.

7 Programs That Help First-Time Homebuyers

Buying a home is so hard, they should make it an Olympic event. It’s not just the paperwork; it’s the terminology, the fees and the number of people involved. It’s natural to want to agree to whatever, sign everything and just get through the process as fast as you can. But while that may make you a medalist in downhill skiing, it won’t earn you many style points in life’s uphill battle to financial well-being.

Here are some of the most useful homebuyer programs that you might overlook if you rush the process. They may score you some big savings.
FHA                                                  
This is the go-to program for many Americans, especially first-time homebuyers and those who have a credit history that’s … let’s say shaky. The Federal Housing Administration guarantees a portion of home loans, which frees lenders to broaden their acceptance standards. With FHA backing, borrowers can qualify for loans with as little as 3.5% down. You can search a list of FHA lenders near you at HUD.gov.


Being Smart About Your Basement Waterproofing

There’s nstock-photo-3413377-flood-damageothing more upsetting than finding water leaking into your basement. Dampness, humidity and mold are sources of anguish for the homeowner, and the health related issues are something to worry about. Water found in your basement can rapidly led to mold, foundation problems, and jeopardized the structural integrity of your home. Finding the right company to waterproof your basement can be a bit troublesome. Scary sales tactics have become commonplace among sales people dealing with basement waterproofing, but don’t be deceived, hire a company with a good and long standing in the community. Check their references, and make sure to get a second opinion.


Myths About Home Basement Waterproofing

Unfortunately there are many misconceptions and myths floating around about waterproofing a basement. We discuss four myths that are among the most common in the waterproofing industry.

Myth #1 – Waterproofing will not stop a basement leak

When a homeowner has a water problem they can elect to make a repair or resolve the problem. In some cases the homeowner may decide to fix the leak without installing a complete waterproofing system. The waterproofing contractor will guarantee their work but that doesn’t stop the water from leaking into the basement from a wall on the other side of the room. A good basement waterproofing company will help the homeowner understand the repair work that will be done and the risks of not installing a complete foundation waterproofing system.

Myth #2 – Black tar paint is a sufficient waterproofing method

In actuality black tar paint is not waterproofing. Black tar paint may keep some of the vapor out but on its own it will not protect you basement from water leaks. Waterproofing systems are made up of several different components that together they will protect your basement from water getting in and if it does get in that it will quickly be pumped back out.

 


Preventive tips for leaky basements

Look For Obvious Solutions

The cause of a wet or damp basement can be minor, readily apparent, and easily corrected. Here are some probable causes and possible solutions:

Problem: The source of water in the basement can not be identified.

Solution: To determine whether the water is seeping in from the outside or condensastion inside, tape a twelve-inch square of aluminum foil to a wall that is prone to dampness, sealing all four sides as airtight as possible. In a day or two, if the side of the foil that was against the wall is wet, the problem is seepage. If the outside is wet, it’s condensation.

Problem: Lawns that are flat or slope toward the house permit surface water (rain and melting snow) to drain down against basement walls. Water enters through cracks or other openings in the walls and causes wet spots on the walls or standing water on the floor.
Solution: Slope the ground away from the outside foundation (about one inch per foot).


Types of Basement Waterproofing

The presence of water in the basement is a sign that a problem lurking underneath that needs your attention. If you allow the problem to continue on, expansive damage could occur to your home. It is in your best interest to talk to a basement waterproofing contractor as soon as possible if you are experiencing signs of water damage, requesting a free estimate could be the best decision you will ever make.

Types of Basement Waterproofing

The basement waterproofing contractor can provide you with a number of different waterproofing services. Talk to the contractor concerning each type and its pros and cons. Services include:

  • Interior Waterproofing

Basement waterproofing companies can provide interior waterproofing. This is the most recommended type of basement waterproofing offered. Through this service you can rest assured that your basement isn’t being damaged due to moisture buildup.

  • Exterior Waterproofing